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Dear Valued Client,

This edition of our client newsletter includes coverage of the 2015 tax penalties for not having health insurance, the importance of reviewing your withholding, unclaimed refunds and much more.

Our goal is to provide you an unparalleled level of client service. If you see something that you want to talk about, please contact us to explore the possibilities. We rely on satisfied clients as the primary source of new business, and your referrals are both welcomed and most sincerely appreciated!



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Tax Penalty For Not Having Insurance Ratchets Up In 2015

The penalty for not having minimum essential health insurance for yourself and other members of your tax family takes a substantial jump in 2015. For 2014, the penalty was the greater of the flat dollar amount ($95 for each adult plus $47.50 for each child under age 18, but no more than $285) or 1% of your household income minus your tax-filing threshold amount. For 2015, those amounts take a substantial jump to $325 for each adult and $162.50 for each child (but no more than $975) or 2% of household income minus the amount of your tax-filing threshold.
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Is Your Refund Too High or Do You Owe Taxes? You Probably Need to Adjust Your W-4

If your income is primarily from wages and you received a very large refund—or worse, if you owed money—then your employer is not withholding the correct amount of tax (but it probably isn’t your employer’s fault). Sure, you like a big refund, but you have to remember you are only getting your own money back that was over-withheld in the first place. Why not bank it and have access to it all year long instead of providing Uncle Sam with an interest-free loan?
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Should You Keep Home Improvement Records?

Many taxpayers don’t feel the need to keep home improvement records, thinking the potential gain will never exceed the amount of the exclusion for home gains ($250,000 or $500,000 if both filer and spouse qualify) if they meet the 2-out-of-5-year use and ownership tests. Here are some situations when having home improvement records could save taxes:
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Is Your Hobby a For-Profit Endeavor?

Whether an activity is a hobby or a business may not be apparent to the customers of the endeavor, but distinguishing the difference is necessary for tax purposes because the tax treatments are substantially different. The IRS provides appropriate guidelines when determining whether an activity is engaged in for profit, such as a business or investment activity, or if it is engaged in as a hobby.
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Do I Have to File a Tax Return?

This is a question many taxpayers ask during this time of year, and the question is far more complicated than people believe. To fully understand, we need to consider that there are times when individuals are REQUIRED to file a tax return, and then there are times when it is to individuals’ BENEFIT to file a return even if they are not required to file.
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Are You Leaving Tax Money On The Table?

Each year the IRS reports about $1 billion in unclaimed refunds for individuals who did not file a tax return. The IRS estimates that approximately half of the unclaimed refunds are for amounts greater than $600. You may not have filed, thinking that because you don’t itemize and your employer is withholding tax that you don’t need to file. But there is a good chance you are leaving money on the table by not filing. Consider the following:
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Accounting Terms: Understanding the accounting term EBITDA and how to use it.

The accounting term EBITDA is an acronym that is widely used. It stands for Earnings Before Interest, Taxation, Depreciation, and Amortization, and it is an extremely helpful tool for understanding how one business or industry is faring based on comparing it to others that are doing the same thing. EBITDA’s value lies in the fact that it gives a very quick assessment of a business’s earnings potential; but, because it is not part of generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP, it is frequently excluded from a business’s official financial statement.
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The Bookkeeping & Management Systems Inc. newsletter is available via e-mail on a free subscription basis. You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time. For more information about - Bookkeeping & Management Systems Inc., go to http://www.bookkeeper.com. This message was sent using ClientWhys Persyst. View our permission marketing policy.

Disclaimer: The tax advice included in this newsletter is an overview of some complex tax rules and is not intended as a thorough in-depth analysis of the tax issues discussed. Do not act on the information included in this newsletter without first determining how these issues apply to your particular set of circumstances and if there are any special tax laws or regulations that might apply to your situation.
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